Cold turkey

TIS teams are funded to carry out population health promotion activities, not individual smoking cessation support. However, it is important that TIS workers have up-to-date knowledge of the individual level cessation supports.

Evidence suggests that supported quit attempts (e.g. using nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), having group or individual counselling) are more successful than unaided attempts. However not everyone wants to use medicine such as NRT, or see a counsellor and many people who smoke quit unaided.

Unaided quitting is known as going ‘cold turkey’. People who smoke who want to quit this way should be advised to make a plan. Planning when they will quit and what they will do when cravings strike means they are more likely to succeed. The aim is to change the habits associated with smoking. This means thinking about things such as when and where someone smokes. Planning includes:

  • setting a quit date
  • throwing away smoking gear (e.g. cigarettes, ashtrays, lighters)
  • changing routines linked with smoking (e.g. instead of smoking in a work break go for a walk)
  • avoiding situations where they usually smoke
  • starting new activities (e.g. exercise) to replace smoking.